From Brian's Desk

Contact Center Excellence – Stand Out From The Crowd

Employee Engagement Improvement Step 4

You’ve made it to step 4 of the series on improving engagement in your call center!  A vital component of any improvement initiative or program, especially one focused on improving engagement, is communication.  Not just any communication, but open and honest communication, and delivered in a way it will be received.

If you are a call center senior leader, and you do not have a Leader Blog, start one this week!  Allocate (that means block off on your calendar) 30 minutes a week to write about what is on your mind.  Challenges, opportunities, status on key initiatives, ‘shout outs’ for great customer service stories, the future, virtually anything that is important to your employees.  Be careful about allowing comments to your Blog posts; you may get more input than you can deal with, and there are likely better avenues for feedback.  No reason to wait!

Do you have a Newsletter?  Have one, either paper or electronic or both.  Share awards, rewards and recognition.  Share positive letters or emails from customers.  Choose an agent or supervisor and do an in-depth personal story or profile.  If online, include photos of everyone in the organization, especially if your employees are in multiple locations, or if some are home-based.  Have someone skilled in media or communications craft the newsletter; the degree of quality will be proportional to readership.

I have found that senior leader roundtables are an effective way to connect with all levels of the organization.  Schedule weekly roundtables, choosing 5-8 front line agents.  Be sure you have a scribe at the roundtable to take notes, todos and follow-ups.  Do not include supervisors or managers!  Use the time to talk candidly about the ‘state of the state’ in the call center, what might be going on within the company or industry.  Ask for questions, comments, points of frustration.  After the roundtable, have your scribe summarize the meeting and communicate with the attendees, thanking them for their time and input.  When choosing the agents for the roundtable, go back to the list you made in step 1.  Ensure you have some of your actively engaged employees present.  This will help ensure you have an audience that is not wholly hostile.  You may also want to have periodic roundtables with your supervisors, especially if you are at least one level removed from them.  Otherwise, the meeting is called a staff meeting.  Again, only include supervisors, not higher level managers.  Be open and honest during the roundtable meetings.  If they are viewed as simply a checkmark in an improvement initiative, you’re better off not holding them at all.

Lastly, ensure you have regular town hall meetings.  This can be a challenge in a call center as you cannot simply take everyone off of the phones for 30 minutes.  You may have to repeat the meeting several times, and at several locations.  So, I wouldn’t propose doing this every month.  However, don’t make the town hall meeting an annual event either.  The town hall meeting is an excellent place to improve the level of engagement, even though it may only do so in the short term.  It is a great way to keep momentum for your overall improvement initiative or program.  These meetings should be fun, maybe even have brief departmental competitions mid way through the meeting.  They are meant to ‘rally the troops’, and as you plan the meetings with your direct reports, make sure to keep this as a primary objective.  You have the opportunity to move some of the tacitly engaged to the actively engaged camp, and some of the actively disengaged into the tacitly engaged camp.  This is not the time or place to drone on about KPIs, this is the time to talk up the value you are driving to the company (Improvement Step 3).  Better yet, have a CxO or very senior executive talk about this.

To net, communication is absolutely a key linchpin in your engagement improvement arsenal.  Without a great effort here, the other 6 steps will not have much effect on engagement.

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